MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Seven Homework Revisited

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Seven: The Written Conclusion Revisited –                                                               Proof Statements | Proof Summary | Proof Argument

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

I’ve covered nearly all of the work that we were set and I find that this is the best bit…and it’s saved till last.  I’ve always done Proof Statements | Proof Summary | Proof Arguments, I just didn’t know that they had a name, but I knew that they had a purpose and a structure. It was like addressing a Jury and proving to them, beyond a reasonable doubt, that my argument was the most likely reason. My execution hasn’t always been perfect, but I’m working on it.  

Little steps, stay focused, grow stronger…all the time!

PROOF STATEMENT

I have chosen to follow some of the work I’ve previously discussed.  It is however, highly relevant to this homework and yes, you may have read this too, but, please indulge me! When I started to get involved with the Tellesson family, there had been a lot of confusion as to how many wives my partner’s great grandfather had, had!  I have found three, but the other problem we also had, was to find the name of his first wife?

“George TELLESSON, born 1837 in Norway was married in 1854 to Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS born 1832 in Wales.”

Simple…yes???…no!!!  I searched high and low for each of their names once I had found an Elizabeth ROBERTS in the Vital Records for UK.  This other name kept ‘popping up but it didn’t make any sense Girt HALOWEN.  Notes were taken and then it was put aside.  It wasn’t until many years later that I was contacted by a researcher who was tracing all the Welsh born Chalinor’s that I went back to it.  The researcher kindly purchased the marriage certificate and then shared it with me.  Looking at the notes again, it all suddenly made sense to me, as an illiterate man George would have not been able to correct the vicar in the church from mis-spelling his name and with a thick Norwegian accent, his name, George TELLESSON must have been misunderstood.

So after many years of not finding their marriage certificate, it was always sitting right under my nose, the details of it at least.1

Marriage_Certificate_George_Tellesson&Elizabeth_Catherine_Roberts

General Register Office, Liverpool, Marriage Certificate, 1854, [George Tellesson] Girt Halowen & Elizabeth Catherine Roberts 

 

PROOF ARGUMENT

Was George TELLESSON’s first wife’s name Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS?

There were instances that his wife’s name was recorded as Elizabeth ROBERTS, Eliza ROBERTS, Catherine Elizabeth ROBERTS, Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS, A (1881 Census UK) AND Catherine Eliza ROBERTS, so where to start?  I had to go back to this marriage certificate of Girt HALOWEN & Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS.

Looking to prove the actual name of George TELLESSON’s first wife.  Was it Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS or was it Catherine Elizabeth ROBERTS?

Due to the poor quality of the scan, I searched for and managed to find a clearer copy from 2Liverpool, England, Marriages and Banns, 1813-1921 – this clearly shows that Elizabeth’s name was originally recorded as Catherine Roberts, then amended to read Elizabeth Catherine Roberts. Still confused? Well I was,  so I had to search further…

Girt_Halowen_Marriage_to_Elizabeth_Catherine_Roberts_1854

General Register Office, Liverpool, Marriage Certificate, 1854, [George Tellesson] Girt Halowen & Elizabeth Catherine Roberts, http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=2197, Image 184, (accessed 10th July 2015 Ancestry.com.au)

The next event I found was the birth of George TELLESSON’s first child, George Robert Australia TELLESSON. Firstly I found his birth registration3

George_Robert_Tellesson_-_Birth_Registration_Index_1856

I then checked for any Baptism record for the child, George Robert TELLESSON.  I found a baptism for George Robert Australia TELLISON.  As the name is almost the same and the parent’s details are similar to the marriage records, I am satisfied that they are the same person. He was also baptised in the same church where his parents were married.4

George_Robert_Australia_Tellison_Baptism_1856

3England & Wales, FreeBMD Death Index, 1837-1915 for George Robert Tellesson – Image 4 [http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=8914]

4http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?gss=angs-c&new=1&rank=1&msT=1&gsfn=george+robert+australia&gsln=TELLESSON&gsln_x=NP_NN_NS&msbdy=1856&msbpn__ftp=Liverpool%2c+Lancashire%2c+England&msbpn=92187&msbpn_PInfo=8-%7c0%7c0%7c3257%7c3251%7c0%7c0%7c0%7c5271%7c92187%7c0%7c&_83004003-n_xcl=f&cpxt=1&cp=11&MSAV=1&uidh=000&pcat=34&h=169922294&db=FS1EnglandBirthsandChristenings&indiv=1&ml_rpos=5 (Accessed 10th July 2015)

The records were rather slim after the birth of George Robert TELLESSON. I could not locate them (the family, George, Elizabeth & George Robert TELLESSON) in the UK Census of 1861. Finally, I found George Robert TELLESSON in the 1861 Census of Wales. He was living with his Aunt, Anne ROBERTS. But where were his parents?5

George Robert Tellesson Aged 5 yrs

George Robert Tellesson Aged 5 yrs

51861 Wales Census for George Tellinson http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=8768 [Image 4] (Accessed 6th June 2015)

Because they were in Wales and I couldn’t find George TELLESSON in the census either, I looked for a death of Elizabeth TELLESSON nee ROBERTS.  I found that Elizabeth had died in 1860 whilst living in Carnarvon, from Consumption.  It would appear that the family had moved to Carnarvon from Liverpool.  I can find no record of the family in-between 1856 and 1860.  I believe that Elizabeth may have been ill for some time and required help from her sister? There was a 16 year age difference between her and Ann & Ann was also illiterate, as she signed the death registration with her mark X.

Death Cert of Elizabeth Catherine Tellesson nee Roberts 1860

 

Registration District Carnarvon, Death Certificate 1860 Elizabeth TELLESSON Application Number 606219-1

In 1862 George TELLESSON married Catherine Elizabeth ROBERTS, 22 May 1862 at St. Nicholas, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.7  Her father’s name was Thomas ROBERTS, this was also the same name of Elizabeth Catherine ROBERTS’ father.

Marriage Register Details of George Tellesson & Catherine Eliza Roberts

Marriage Register Details of George Tellesson & Catherine Eliza Roberts

7Liverpool, England, Marriages and Banns, 1813-1921 http://search.ancestry.com.au/search/db.aspx?dbid=2197 George TELLESSON & Catherine Eliza ROBERTS 1862 [Image 118] (Accessed 10th July 2015)

It is clear to me that the mix up of names has now been explained.  The mixture of names is  as a result of the two sisters having names that could easily be interchanged.  In fact one tree on Ancestry, has George Robert TELLESSON as  the son of Catherine Eliza ROBERTS?

Finally I hope I have successfully solved the mystery of the many wives of George TELLESSON. He wasn’t a man who married too many times, but I guess that depends if you call three marriages excessive.  The two ROBERTS sisters died quite young and it appears from the medical history that I know about the Tellesson family, it continued down the generations.  Indeed out of the nine children of George TELLESSON, with the two sisters, that I have located, only four survived into adulthood.

8http://trees.ancestry.com.au/tree/12016613/person/1028519681 (Accessed 10th July 2015)

 

If you wish to view this excellent Hangout On Air please visit here: Hangout On Air

Cheers,

Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the Passion of Family History

 

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Seven Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Seven: The Written Conclusion

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

This week I am discussing Clear Writing as it relates to the Genealogical Proof Standard in The Written Conclusion.

GENEALOGICAL PROOF STANDARDS

I would begin by checking if, up to this point, that I have followed all the Genealogical Proof Standards to this point?

By asking myself the following questions:

  • Have I done a “reasonably exhaustive search”?
  • Have I created proper source citations? Ideally I would have done this whilst I was gathering all the information, so I didn’t have to go back and search for it. Haven’t we done that once or twice before?
  • Did I analyse the sources one at a time to determine whether it was primary or secondary and was it an authored work, original or derivative record? As was covered in greater detail in Chapter Five: Analysis and Correlation. (See Notebelow)
  • Have I resolved any conflicting evidence by assembling the evidence into a form of conclusion? Did I have any weaknesses in the evidence that I’m using? This is crucial when obtaining vital record information, eg., A Birth Index entry that has been derived from the Birth Record it has been extracted and created from cannot be an independent piece of evidence. I have always searched for at least two independent sources of information.
  • Is my logic flawed?  Have I made the right assumptions? It is very easy to think that we are right about the assumptions that we have made but were we right to make those assumptions in the first place?  Do we have any bias that may influence, incorrectly, the assumptions made?

1435243775689_research

ASSUMPTIONS – THE CHECKING OF

We can reasonably expect that no one is going to have children or get married before they are born.  This is fundamentally accepted and no one is going to question us if we make this type of assumption.

Also, a valid assumption is if we assume that most births of children occur between the ages of early teens & late forties for mothers, no one would challenge that.  But if a woman is claiming to have had a child after the age of fifty, then I would be looking for a daughter as the mother of the child. This has cropped up many times in research I have undertaken.

Finally, I want to discuss unsound assumptions.  This is one that can get you into a lot of trouble if you do not check your sources.  Never, ever assume that a women’s family name that she brings into a marriage is her maiden name period!!! She may have been married and widowed, particularly I have found this happened a lot in the mid 19th century, with the industrial age progressing at the pace it did.  Work safety hadn’t really been heard of then, I have seen many young women, widowed in their early twenties having to marry again quickly because they were left with young children and no sources of income.

1435243996732_research

 

CLEAR WRITING

In his instruction about Clear Writing, Thomas Jones discusses 12 points that should be covered in proof statements, summaries and the arguments. The 12 points need to cover the choice of words, the construction of sentences, paragraphs, the overall construction of these statements, summaries and the arguments along with the overall tone in which it is said.

  1. We need to keep it simple. In plain and clear English, no ambiguity and ‘puff & stuff’
  2. Sentence structure is grammatically correct.
  3. Writing is constructed in the correct tense.  As most of the writing is attributable to dead people, it is kept in the past tense.
  4. Keep the tenses in the correct tense.  Do not mix them, it will confuse people!
  5. The narrative is focused on the people we are telling the story about.  All sources are contained in citations and footnotes, to keep the flow of the story going.
  6. The evidence must be the STAR of the story.
  7. We keep focused on the story and don’t meander off on a tangent that doesn’t directly relate to the story that is being told.
  8. No speculation is allowed, stick to the actual facts known.
  9. Keep the narrative proof summaries to just that, a summary!
  10. Transitions keep the narrative flowing. Using sub-headings to keep the focus moving forward.
  11. We ‘speak’ like Perry Mason…we show the conclusion so it is like irrefutable proof!
  12. The write up is precise and remains objective plus focused so that anyone reading it would not be expecting flowers to spring out of the pages. Refrain from really descriptive words that can come across as personal and subjective.

1435244030167_research

To my mind, I begin with the end in mind.  If the write up is for a Client, I try not to make it too wordy, I don’t want to lose their interest.  I can get a lot more technical if it is for my Peers. Having the sources located within the footnotes, make it a lot easier to read too. Keeping in mind that any discussion of “Proof” will have to be in the words of Thomas Jones “more precise and persuasive than segments describing people, activities and events”.

NOTE1: To assist with the gathering of the information to create citations I created my own template to use.  You are welcome to use this, as I believe by creating the information as we find it, will result in an accurate citation of sources and that just has to be a good thing.  The template is based on the questions raised figure 4, Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) Chapter 4, Page 40 SOURCE CITATION TEMPLATE

If you wish to view this excellent Hangout On Air please visit here: Hangout On Air

Cheers,

Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the Passion of Family History

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Six Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Six: Resolving Conflicts and Assembling Evidence

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

Chapter Five – I’ve had a lot of trouble over the years with UK Census records  trying to track down the Tellesson family.  I’d like to share the journey that I’ve taken and it is just so relevant to all the exercises in Chapter Six this week.

 

Finding George Tellesson & his daughter Lilly Tellesson…

Last week I introduced you to the Tellesson family from Liverpool, England & also from Carnarvon, Wales, UK.

Searching for George Tellesson, born Norway 1837.  George was very difficult to find, as evidenced from his first marriage, his name was recorded as Girt Halowen.  I can only imagine that his thick Norwegian accent was a player in this recording of his name. Because I found this marriage through Elizabeth Catherine Roberts, I was left with a variety of names, due to the manner in which marriages are recorded in the UK.  There are generally, four female names and four male names and you need to “match” them up.

Marriage_Certificate_George_Tellesson&Elizabeth_Catherine_Roberts

After Elizabeth Catherine Tellesson nee Roberts died George married relatively quickly to Elizabeth’s younger sister Catherine Elizabeth Roberts and 13 November 1862 Elizabeth Jane Tellesson was born this appears in the registers of births as Elizabeth Jane Tillotson.

Elizabeth_Jane_Tillotson

George Tellesson has been found through the UK Census & other Vital Records under various spellings of his name:

Halowen – Tillotson – Tillison – Lillisson – Telesson – Yollison

1871 Census Tellesson Family

1871 UK Census Tellesson Family

1871 UK Census Tellesson Family

1881 UK Census Tellesson Family

1881_Census_Tellesson_Family

1891 UK Census Tellesson Family

1891 UK Census -Catherine E Lillisson

1891 UK Census -Catherine E Lillisson

1901 UK Census Tellesson Family

1901 UK Census George Yollison

1901 UK Census
George Yollison

To follow some of the information studied in Chapter Six, I created a table to timeline and Resolve Conflicts and Assemble the Evidence known from information researched:

Copy of Table Used to Resolve Conflicts and Assembling of Evidence on the Tellesson Family

Date Name of Source/Event Type of Information 1P-S-I Type of Source 2A-O-D Location of Article Comments on Conclusions Made
1855 Marriage Certificate of Girt Halowen and Elizabeth Catherine Roberts p D Copy of Marriage Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Girt Halowen is AKA George Tellesson
1862 Birth Certificate of Elizabeth Jane Tillotson P O Copy of Birth Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Elizabeth Jane Tillotson is daughter of George & Catherine Elizabeth Tillotson AKA George & Catherine Elizabeth Tellesson
1884 Marriage Certificate of George Robert Tellesson & Elizabeth Egan P D Copy of Marriage  Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Lilly Tellesson is listed as a witness on the Marriage Certificate of George Robert Tellesson & Elizabeth Egan
1887 Marriage Certificate of Charles Chalinor to Lily Tellesson P D Copy of Marriage Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Elizabeth Jane Tellesson is now listed as Lily Tellesson on her marriage to Charles Chalinor

 

1P = Primary S = Secondary I = Indeterminable

2A = Authored O = Original D = Derivative

Finally I found that Elizabeth Jane Tellesson was variously listed during her life as:

Elizabeth Jane Tillotson – Lilly Tillotson – Lily Tellesson – Lily Chalinor – Elizabeth Jane Chaloner – Lillian Chaloner

Citing one’s sources allows not just you, but anyone else to go back to where you obtained the information.  This is essential if you discover an inconsistency and need to go back and check the information.  Without the citation, it is almost impossible to verify the information. This has been brought home to me as I gathered the information for this article.  I was missing a lot of information that I had recorded, but I wasn’t able to locate all the documentation.  This meant that I had to re-do the research.  But the good thing is, this time around I have kept all the information and in fact I have found further information that I can now add to the story of the Tellesson Family…AGAIN TO BE CONTINUED!

NOTE: To assist with the gathering of the information to create citations I created my own template to use.  You are welcome to use this, as I believe by creating the information as we find it, will result in accurate citation of sources and that just has to be a good thing.  The template is based on the questions raised figure 4, Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) Chapter 4, Page 40 SOURCE CITATION TEMPLATE

If you wish to view this excellent Hangout On Air please visit here: Hangout On Air

Cheers,

Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the Passion of Family History

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Five Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Five: Analysis and Correlation

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

Chapter Five – I’ve had a lot of trouble over the years with UK Census records  trying to track down the Tellesson family.  I’d like to share the journey that I’ve taken and it is just so relevant to all the exercises in Chapter Five this week.

 

Finding The Tellesson Family of Liverpool England…

The first of the Tellesson family found should be in the UK Census of 1851.  The biggest problem I’ve discovered is that the Head of the family, George Tellesson was born in Norway in 1837 and he was illiterate.  With his Norwegian accent I imagine it would have been difficult to interpret some of the information that he would have given. (I was so positive this would have raised some issues, I actually took employment during one Australian Census as an Enumerator. I felt that this would help me understand some of the limitations that occur on the Census records.)  However, I have not yet been able to find any trace of the family in the 1851 UK Census.

My conclusion for this information is that the family was not yet together. Further exhaustive research eventually found the marriage of George Tellesson to Elizabeth Catherine Roberts on the 07 Jun 1854 at Our Lady & St. Nicholas, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.  It had taken many years of research to find the actual Marriage Certificate, which was located when I took notes of marriages in the local area and shared that information with another researcher, approximately 20 years later as a matter of “last resort”. I found the couple’s details by searching for the Bride’s name and I will discuss this further in the next chapter, Chapter Six – Resolving Conflicts and Assembling Evidence.

Marriage_Certificate_George_Tellesson&Elizabeth_Catherine_Roberts

Birth of the Tellesson Family’s First Child – Again, spelling delayed the finding of George & Elizabeth’s first child.  But dogged determination eventually paid off and a child was found.

George Robert Tellesson Baptism Details

George Robert Tellesson Baptism Details

1861 UK Census –

Again, there was difficulty locating the family in the UK Census and it was only once I searched for first child of George Tellesson, also named George Tellesson did I find some of the family…in Wales, not Liverpool.

George Robert Tellesson Aged 5 yrs

George Robert Tellesson Aged 5 yrs

This alerted me to the fact that his mother wasn’t around, I searched for deaths and found that she had died in 1860

Death Cert of Elizabeth Catherine Tellesson nee Roberts 1860

Eventually George Tellesson married again and this time it was to Catherine Eliza Roberts, which we felt that there may have been some connection to Elizabeth Catherine Roberts, George’s first wife…but this wasn’t discovered until the first Marriage Certificate was purchased and it was confirmed that Thomas Roberts was the father of both Elizabeth Catherine Roberts & Catherine Eliza Roberts. Further research is continuing and will be discussed in another week’s posting.

Marriage Register Details of George Tellesson & Catherine Eliza Roberts

Marriage Register Details of George Tellesson & Catherine Eliza Roberts

To follow some of the information studied in Chapter Five, I created a table to timeline and Analyse & Correlate the information known and re-discovered:

Copy of Table Used to Analyse and Correlate Information on the Tellesson Family

Date Name of Source/Event Type of Information 1P-S-I Type of Source 2A-O-D Location of Article Comments on Conclusions Made
1855 Marriage Certificate of Girt Halowen and Elizabeth Catherine Roberts p D Copy of Marriage Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Girt Halowen is AKA George Tellesson
1856 Baptisim Certificate George Robert Australia Tellison P O Copy of Baptism Register Held by Fiona Tellesson George Robert Australia Tellesson is son of George & Elizabeth Tellison AKA George Robert Tellesson son of George & Elizabeth Tellesson
1860 Death Certificate of Elizabeth Telleson P D Copy of Death Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson Elizabeth Telleson is Elizabeth Catherine Tellesson nee Roberts
1862 Marriage Certificate of George Iellesson and Catherine Elisa Roberts P D Copy of Marriage Certificate Held by Fiona Tellesson George Iellesson and Catherine Elisa Roberts are George Tellesson and Catherine Eliza Roberts *Catherine and Elizabeth were Sisters

1P = Primary S = Secondary I = Indeterminable

2A = Authored O = Original D = Derivative

 

Citing one’s sources allows not just you, but anyone else to go back to where you obtained the information.  This is essential if you discover an inconsistency and need to go back and check the information.  Without the citation, it is almost impossible to verify the information. This has been brought home to me as I gathered the information for this article.  I was missing a lot of information that I had recorded, but I wasn’t able to locate all the documentation.  This meant that I had to re-do the research.  But the good thing is, this time around I have kept all the information and in fact I have found further information that I can now add to the story of the Tellesson Family…TO BE CONTINUED!

NOTE: To assist with the gathering of the information to create citations I created my own template to use.  You are welcome to use this, as I believe by creating the information as we find it, will result in accurate citation of sources and that just has to be a good thing.  The template is based on the questions raised figure 4, Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) Chapter 4, Page 40 SOURCE CITATION TEMPLATE

If you wish to view this excellent Hangout On Air please visit here: Hangout On Air

Cheers,

Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the Passion of Family History

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Four Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Four: Source Citations

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

Chapter Four, now this is really meaty.  The discussion was about using Source Citations which for some of us would be a foreign thing to do.  My family have all gone to University and I’m aware that this process was required for all the papers that they submitted.  Never did I think I would be requiring to use it in Genealogy.  But it makes perfect sense…NOW!

During last weeks research in which I debunked a family folklore, which had been passed down, generation upon generation.  The one thing that stood out, glaringly was the lack of ‘source citations’.

I questioned my First Cousin, once removed as to where the information had come from? He stated that another cousin (Wes) had passed it on.  I came across a family pedigree during this week in which Wes (the cousin) who had passed it on was listed as the source of information…but where did he get it from?  In the research that I did, I found that Jane Sampson (being my 3XGGGrandmother) did indeed have a brother by the name of John Sampson.  But in this instance this John Sampson is not the John Sampson (Grandfather of Sir Robert Gordon Menzies – former Prime Minister of Australia), but he is the actual brother of Jane Sampson and he was three years younger. (This now requires further research).

 

KEEP_CALM_&_CITE_YOUR_SOURCES!

 

Citing one’s sources allows not just you, but anyone else to go back to where you obtained the information.  This is essential if you discover an inconsistency and need to go back and check the information.  Without the citation, it is almost impossible to verify the information.

Found But No Citation

It was interesting to see that for the purpose of Genealogy that Thomas. W. Jones gives us three different resources for citations:

  • The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual
  • The Chicago Manual of Style
  • Evidence Explained

To assist with the gathering of the information to create citations I created my own template to use.  You are welcome to use this, as I believe by creating the information as we find it, will result in more accurate citation of sources and that just has to be a good thing.  The template is based on the questions raised figure 4, Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013) Chapter 4, Page 40 SOURCE CITATION TEMPLATE

It was interesting to see that whilst I was researching articles for last week’s homework on the Trove website (Newspapers Online for Australia) that they have many different types of citations that can be used, here is an article:

Pawned And here are the citations:

Article identifier: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82660405

Page identifier: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page7999223

APA citation: A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE. (1898, September 17).The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1950), p. 3. Retrieved May 29, 2015, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82660405MLA citation”A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE.”

MLA citation: “A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE.” The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1950) 17 Sep 1898: 3. Web. 29 May 2015 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82660405>.Harvard/Australian citation1898 ‘A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE.’,

Harvard/Australian citation: 1898 ‘A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE.’, The Daily News(Perth, WA : 1882 – 1950), 17 September, p. 3, viewed 29 May, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82660405

Wikipedia citation: {{cite news |url=http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82660405 |title=A FAWNED GENEALOGICAL TREE. |newspaper=[[Daily_News_(Perth,_Western_Australia)|The Daily News (Perth, WA : 1882 – 1950)]] |location=Perth, WA |date=17 September 1898 |accessdate=29 May 2015 |page=3 |publisher=National Library of Australia}}

This requires extensive work on my part and is a ‘Work In Progress’

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Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the passion of family history

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Three Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Three: “Reasonably Exhaustive” Research

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

This chapter really resonated for me from the third chapter.  In it was discussed the reason for  “Reasonably Exhaustive” Research and how as genealogists, the types of sources that we would be trying to locate. I urge you to consider this when looking at your sources, to consider the strength of what your research has been. Having just spent an “exhaustive” amount of time trying to prove the relationship, listed below, I’ve been lead on many a merry chase.  This is what I’ve found:

1. (a)  We need to ensure that we have tried to locate two independent sources of evidence?

So my question is: Is John Sampson (Grandfather of Sir Robert Gordon Menzies – former Prime Minister of Australia) the brother of Jane Sampson? Jane Sampson being my 3XGGGrandmother.

The answer to this question lies in my family folklore…a family history written back in the 1980’s proposed that they were brother & sister.  One source that I have available is the Wedding Certificate of Jane Sampson when she married Joseph Harry. On the Marriage Certificate[1], which Jane signs with an X, it states that Thomas Sampson is her father. John Sampson has John Sampson listed as his father. Further investigation has shown that in the 1841 Census (UK) [2] there is a Jane Sampson, with a brother John Sampson (younger by 3 yrs). See below for actual Certificate.

[1] Copy of Wedding Certificate held by Fiona Tellesson

[2] http://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=gbc%2f1841%2f0142%2f0146&parentid=gbc%2f1841%2f0004260139&highlights=%22%22  Accessed 21st May 2015

(b) As competent researchers (genealogists), what sources would we examine?

As I chose to do my own direct line, I had some of the following sources to check;

Parish Records, Cornwall, England UK|Census Records UK|

(c) What was some of the primary information that we located?

Census Records UK

(d) Original Records?

Census Records UK

(e) Authored Works, derivative records?

Parish Records, as they have been transcribed and are not the actual original records that I’m looking at.

(f) So far I’ve only been able to find the Parish Records and the Census (UK)

2 (a) Two evidence items located?  At this point in time, no.  But from what I know I can proceed to either prove or disprove, whether or not I ever find two evidence items, well, I’m not confident of finding this at the current time.

(b) What sources would ‘Competent’ Genealogists explore for the evidence?

Starting at the beginning, seemed like a good idea, as I hadn’t revisited this query for quite some time.  This opportunity was a golden one, so I was enthusiastic when I commenced.  I started with the better known individual, John Sampson, Grandfather of the former Australian Prime Minister, Sir Robert Gordon Menzies.

John travelled to Australia in 1854. He came to join the Gold Rush that had hit Australia, to make his fortune.  Eventually settling in Creswick, Victoria. He worked for many years as a Miner and eventually became the President of the newly founded Miner’s Union. He led a Miner’s Strike and as a direct result of this found himself unable to gain employment in the Mining Industry…ever!!! [3]

[3] Robert Menzies ‘A Life Volume 1 1894-1943′
*Menzies, Afternoon Light,5.

I found this interesting, but I needed to go further back and try to establish a sibling relationship between Jane Sampson and this John Sampson…easy…right?  Nuh…ah!  This was the longest day of ‘Exhaustive’ research ever!  I couldn’t locate John with his parents, John Sampson and Catherine Williams.  But I did find his siblings with his parents in the 1851 Census (UK) [4], as he named his daughter Kate after his sister and mother, Kate Sampson aged 16 yrs born Penzance, Cornwall, England and his brother Edward Sampson aged 13 yrs also born in Penzance, Cornwall, England.  So far so good…but there was no Jane.  Now remember, Jane had emigrated to Australia with her husband, Joseph Harry. Together they set sail aboard the immigrant ship “British Empire”, leaving the Port of London on the 7th February 1849.  They either came seeking a better life.  Very much like John Sampson also did in 1854.

I managed to locate John’s Marriage Index entry [5] for his marriage to Mary Jane ORGAN:

John_Sampson_Marriage_Penzance_1854

[4] Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005), www.ancestry.com.au, Class: HO107; Piece: 1912; Folio: 374; Page: 9; GSU roll: 221066. Record for Catherine Sanepsore. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=uki1851&h=17640396&indiv=try.

[5] John Sampson Marriage Record
England & Wales marriages 1837-2008 Image – http://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=bmd%2fm%2f1854%2f3%2fmz%2f000418%2f029 Accessed 22/05/2015

Well this was clearly not getting me anywhere and I was still no closer to proving any relationship between John Sampson and Jane Sampson.  Time to change tact and go to Jane Sampson and see what records were now available for her.

Her marriage certificate:

Joseph Harry & Jane Sampson Wedding Certificate

Joseph Harry & Jane Sampson Wedding Certificate

The only problem I have with the Certificate is that Thomas is now listed as a Miner, when on the 1841 Census (UK) he was a farmer.  Times were changing and it wasn’t uncommon for farmers to move into mining. (Copy of Certificate held by Fiona Tellesson).

I feel confident, in saying that John Sampson, Grandfather of Sir Robert Gordon Menzies and Jane Sampson, my 3XGGGrandmother are not siblings!

 

 

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Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the passion of family history

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper Two Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

 

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

 

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter Two: Fundamental Concepts

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

This chapter was a great follow on from the first.  In it we are asked to not look too broadly for answers when we are researching.  That approach can ‘muddy the waters’ and not help us at all with the results we are searching for.  To narrow the search can assist us in getting a more targeted answer, without sending us off on other tangents.  The focus is beneficial, it remains more relevant and I believe we get better results in the outcomes for our research.

 

1. We need to answer “Who are the parents of Phillip Prichett of Virginia and Kentucky and how did we go about proving it?

 

2. In the article we also discover the answer to two more questions, that may have been asked:

  • Which county Phillip Prichett paid land taxes in, Virginia or Kentucky?
  • Was the Phillip “Prichard” mentioned in the in the lawsuit against Moses Baker actually Phillip Prichett who may have been living in, Virginia or Kentucky?

Don’t worry, if you’re confused…it is a really confusing scenario and not an easy example for eager newbie genealogists to follow.  But real life research, can certainly be just like this.

 

3. After reading the article in Appendix B,  I decided that the following “Were the following people named, Charles D McLain, D McLain, David McLane, Daniel McLane and David R McLain of Michigan and Ottawa County, the same person?”

I have experienced this in my own research and in actual fact my Father-In-Law was known all his life by his middle name, Keith.  As a child growing up, his father (George) would call him Thomas (his first name) and his mother (Ethel) and the rest of their family would address him as Keith.

Poor neighbours thought that George and Ethel had four boys.  They had three, William George, Thomas Keith and Malcolm Robert. He used to tell me this story often and I share it here in memory of Thomas Keith Tellesson (RIP).

 

4. Other questions that we can answer from the article are:

  • What was the age/date of birth for Charles McLain?
  • What was Charles McLain’s occupation?

 

5. Questions I would be asking for three relationship researches I plan to undertake.

  • How are John Sampson (Grandfather of Robert Gordon Menzies) & Jane Harry nee Sampson related? (Family history states that they are brother & sister, however, from my research, they have different (named) fathers.
  • Who were the parents of Jane Harry nee Sampson, husband of Joseph Harry and mother of James Harry b1848 of St. Hilary, Cornwall?
  • When did Samuel Harry, brother of Joseph Harry, of St. Hilary, Cornwall, England, arrive in Australia from United States of America?

 

6.  Sample of an identity research question for my research:

  • Which John McLaren from Glasgow, emigrated to Tasmania, Australia?

 

7. An activity research question for my research is:

  • On which ship did Samuel William Harry emigrate to Australia from the United States of America?

 

8. Some of the authored works cited in the articles in appendixes A and B:

  • The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th ed. (New York, Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1911), s. v. (36)
  • Joan W. Peters, “The Tax Man Cometh. Land and Property in Colonial Fauquier County, Virginia: Tax List from the Fauquier County Court Clerk’s Loose Papers 1759-1782 (Westminster, Md.; Willow Bend, 1999) (32)
  • Thomas W Jones, “Merging Identities Properly: Jonathan Tucker Demonstrates the Technique,” NGS Quarterly 88 (June 2000):111-21. (1)
  • William Gerald rector, “Loggers and Logging to 1870,” in log Transportation in the lake states lumber Industry:1840-1918 (Glendale, Calif,: Arthur H Clark, 1953), 72-77. (7)

 

9. Some of the original records cited in the article in appendix A:

  • Montgomery Co, Ky, Will Book A (2)
  • Kentucky Tax Assessor, Tax Books, Clark Co., 1795-96 (5)
  • Fauquier Co, Minute Book, 1781-84 p. 192 (6)
  • Virginia Auditor of Public Accounts, Personal Property Tax Lists, Fairfax County, 1780-1790A and 1790B-1809A (7)

 

10. Derivative records cited in the article in appendix A:

  • Schreiner-Yantis & Speakman Love, The 1787 Census of Virginia…(9)
  • Beth Mitchell, Fairfax County Road Orders: 1749-1800…(18)
  • George Harrison Sanford King, comp, The Register of Overwharton Parish… (26)
  • Joan W. Peters, “The Tax Man Cometh. Land and Property in Colonial Fauquier County, Virginia: Tax List from the Fauquier County Court Clerk’s Loose Papers 1759-1782…(32)

 

11. Derivative records contain secondary information and will not be as accurate. Original records contain primary information and I would consider this to be the most accurate, as it would be reported by either a participant or a witness to the event.

 

12. Once I found an entry of interest in “Californian Birth Index 1905-1995” on Ancestry.com (http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=5247&enc=1) Depending on the information, I could purchase the original birth certificate, check the US Census and other information to obtain other information.  I did this recently with someone I know, and there is also a lot of school information available through Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com. California Birth Index, 1905-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Original data: State of California. California Birth Index, 1905-1995. Sacramento, CA, USA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics.

 

13. List elements of three additional primary information items & three secondary information items with identified informants in the article in Appendix B.

 

INFORMATION  TYPE SOURCE INFORMANT
Charles McLain was a Sawyer in 1871 Primary Muskegon Co, Mich, record of marriages (6) Unknown
Charles McLain & Ida McLain divorce in 1879 Primary Allegan Co, Circuit Court File 1355, Ida M McLain v Charles D McLain (11)  Ida McLain
Ida’s mother name is Calista J Tucker Primary Allegan Co, Circuit Court File 1355, Ida M McLain v Charles D McLain (11) Calista J Tucker
Ida listed as 15 years old at her marriage Secondary Bernice (nee Leach) (Burlinghame) Turner…interview by author (2) Earl McLain’s mother
Charles McLain date of birth given as 1 February 1849 Secondary “[Charles D McLain] Obituary”…(22) Unknown
James McLain dies 16th Dec 1885 Secondary Kent Co, Probate file 4735…(66) “Margeanna” McLean, estranged widow of James

 

14 List three additional information items from the article in Appendix A that the author has used as direct evidence.

 

INFORMATION SOURCE QUESTION ANSWER
Stafford County Deed Showing Lewis owned 240 acres in the country Stafford Co Deed Book…(24) Did Lewis own land? Yes 240 acres in Stafford Co
Marriage details George Harrison Sanford King, comp, The Register of Overwharton97…(37) Who were the parents of Philip? Lewis Pritcher and Mary Lattimore
Christening Register Records with Lewis as the child of parents Lewis & Mary. George Harrison Sanford King, comp, The Register of Overwharton… (26) Who were Lewis Pritchett’s parents? Lewis & Mary Pritchett

 

15 In the table below, list three additional sets of information items from the article in appendix A that the author uses as indirect evidence.

INFORMATION  SOURCES QUESTION ANSWER
Timeline to find Mary’s husband (31) Who is the husband of Mary Prichett? Lewis Pritchett senior
A minor’s parent was able to represent as “next friend (35)- (36)  “Who was it that represented Philip in the lawsuit in 1783 in Fauquier Co.? Philip’s Father, Lewis Pritchett

16 In the table below, list two or more additional absence-of-information items from the article in appendix A that the author uses as negative evidence.

ABSENCE OF INFORMATION ITEM SOURCE QUESTION ANSWER
Philip wasn’t paying taxes before 1796 Tax Lists (notes 10 & 14) When was Philip Pritchett born? No

17 One item by itself doesn’t answer the question alone, but the answer is found when several pieces of information are pieced together.

 

18 In the absence of what may be expected to be found in a source, not being found, actually answers the question.

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Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the passion of family history

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MGP Study Group 3 – Chaper One Homework

On the invitation of “Dear Myrtle” (Pat Richley-Erickson) I have joined the panelists in the third group to participate in a Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group.  I will be posting my homework here and trust that you will learn about the topic we are discussing and also learning about.  Have fun!

 

MGP-Study_Group_3_Header

 

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof, also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]

Chapter One: Genealogy’s Standard of Proof

Homework by Fiona Tellesson

 

1. Genealogy – The Dictionary meaning gives us “Generation” & “Knowlege” We know it more as the study of research into the familial hierarchy, with names and dates of Births, Deaths and Marriages, generation upon generation. More often than not these people are unknown to us. One of the earliest genealogies comes from the book of Genesis, it records the descendants of Adam and Eve.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogies_in_the_Bible#Family_tree_of_Adam

2. Genealogy Proof Standard has five elements which I’m going to discuss here:

[i] “Reasonably exhaustive” in research that might be expected to locate information for research. You check, double check & review for thoroughness. This can save time in the long run, if you have to revisit and revisit the source for details recorded.

[ii] “Complete & Accurate” All sources of all the information found should be recorded so that anybody who didn’t know the information, could go to that same source and find the exact details.

[iii] There must be a degree of analysis of the information found, which should be compared to establish whether or not it can be utilised as evidence to the questions that have been raised in the process of researching.

[iv] If the evidence found (during the research process) conflicts with other evidence held, it is imperative that further investigations take place to resolve them.

[v] In your conclusion which is called a “Proof Argument” you should:

  • Explain the question that you wish to resolve.
  • Review the known sources that you have identified in your research
  • Present all the evidence found along with the source citations and your analysis of those sources used
  • You need to talk about conflicting evidence if there is any. Another search may be required to test the conflict.
  • A closing summary should summarize the main points of your research and state your final conclusion.

3.  It is important that the supporting writing in a Family History/Genealogy is there to provide the accuracy of the information as support for the arguments made. Future readers need to be aware of the assumptions and the background to them.  Without that information, it would only tell, in my opinion, part of the story.  I wouldn’t be keen to share the information without the narrative.

4.  All parts of the GPS are interwoven, you cannot have one part of it without any of the other parts.

5.  We need to ask questions, which we should document, about people, places, events, etc., that have occurred in the past.

2015-05-05_2130

 

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Fiona                                                                                                                                               Sharing the passion of family history

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Gallipoli Hero – Captain Samuel William HARRY – 100 Years On

GALLIPOLI HERO

CAPTAIN SAMUEL WILLIAM HARRY

100 YEARS ON

 

Captain Samuel William Harry

Captain Samuel William Harry

Every ANZAC Day there would be a ceremony held at the State School I attended. I would hear about Simpson and his Donkey and his gallant efforts to rescue the wounded soldiers fighting on the narrow peninsula, then known as the Dardanelles. (From, Wikipedia…The Dardanelles, formerly known as Hellespont, is a narrow strait in northwestern Turkey connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara. It is one of the Turkish Straits, along with its counterpart, the Bosporus.) I always felt I had a connection…but to my knowledge, as a 7/8 yr old, I didn’t know of any family member, nor extended family member who had fought at Gallipoli.

Then in my early 20’s a cousin printed up a family history of the HARRY family. In that, there was mention of a Samuel William Harry who had died in Gallipoli…I was hooked. I had to find out EVERYTHING about Samuel William HARRY, who was my first cousin 4Xremoved. This is what Peter Reid wrote in the Harry Family History: “Samuel is known to have come to Australia from Cornwall, England and settled in Queensland, where his descendants still reside. A son of Samuel’s, Captain Samuel William HARRY, was killed in action in the First World War.” It was not a lot to go on, but it was all I had at the time and it was going to be many years until I unraveled the whole story, this is what I discovered.

Samuel William HARRY was the youngest child of eight from Samuel William HARRY & Sarah Hannah PORRITT. He was born in Pennsylvania, USA on Thursday 09 Feb 1882. Samuel William HARRY Snr, was a miner, as a skilled miner he traveled the world along with his family seeking work during the 19th Century, hence the children were born in England, Ireland and the USA. The family appears in the UK Census of 1851, 1861, 1871 and the US Census of 1880, before Samuel William HARRY jnr was born.

1880 US Census - Family of Samuel William Harry Snr

1880 US Census – Family of Samuel William Harry Snr

Samuel William HARRY, along with his parents & some siblings, moved to Charters Towers when he was aged 7yrs in 1889. He was educated at the Boys’ Central State School. He was already a member of the command in the local Senior Cadets at the outbreak of war, he had served for four years as a Commissioned Officer in 2nd Infantry.

The Kanowna - Date Unknown

The Kanowna – Date Unknown

Samuel William Harry jnr was mobilised for service in the war in August 1914. He embarked in Cairns, Queensland on the 8th August 1914, for Thursday Island, (War Station) Garrison Duty. Samuel then went on to enlist for service outside Australia on the 14th August 1914. He re-embarked on the “Kanonwa” to take part in the capture of German New Guinea. Taken on the strength of Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) vide routine order number 1 dated 9th September 1914. He returned to Townsville on the 18th September 1914 on account of the trouble caused by the firemen on the troop ship.

Source: australian-pow-ww2.com/new_guinea_1914_21.html

According to Wikipedia – During August and September 1914, Kanowna was requisitioned by the Australian military to transport 1,000 soldiers to German New Guinea as part of the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force. Sailing late from Townsville on 8 August, however, the ship was forced to anchor off Thursday Island until 16 August, and did not arrive off Port Moresby until 6 September. The expeditionary force sailed the next day for Rabaul, but Kanowna fell behind the rest of the convoy, with the ship’s master signalling to HMAS Sydney that his crew had mutinied: the boiler stokers and firemen had stopped work. In Arthur Jose’s Royal Australian Navy-focused volume of the Official History of Australia in the War of 1914–1918, he claims that the mutiny was because these men refused to leave Australian waters, but Tom Frame and Kevin Baker state in ‘Mutiny!’ that this is incorrect; the troopship was on short rations of food and water because of the delays sailing north and only minimal resupply in Port Moresby, but the stokers and firemen were requesting more water to remain hydrated in the hot boiler rooms and to wash off coal grime and refused to work until this demand was met. The workers were taken into the custody of a party of soldiers, and the force’s commander ordered Kanowna to return to Townsville, with soldiers volunteering to keep the ship running. The Australian Commonwealth Naval Board conducted an inquiry into the mutiny, even though as a civilian vessel, Kanowna technically wasn’t under their jurisdiction. The state of the supplies was seen as a major contributing factor to the sailors’ actions. Kanowna was returned to her owners on 21 September 1915. More about this campaign can be found at australian-pow-ww2.com/new_guinea_1914_21.html

[Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSS_Kanowna]

Samuel William HARRY did not participate in the capture of German New Guinea. He was discharged on the 18th September 1914 and classified as being eligible for the British War Medal vide BRM 52/572, his rank at this time was that of a 2nd Lieutenant.

History of Service

History of Service

His left his widowed mother ‘of mature years.’ Four sisters, two brothers; all married. (Source: Rockhampton Daily Record 29 Jul 1915 p7)., His father had died in 1897, in Charters Towers, Queensland, Australia. Prior to the outbreak of the first world war, Samuel William Harry jnr was 5’5″ tall and in good physical health.

Further history of the Kennedy Regiment that Samuel William Harry served in can be found at diggerhistory.info/pages-army-today/state-regts/31rqr.htm

HARRY, Samuel William Town Hall, Charters Towers, North Queensland Embarkations:
From Melbourne, Victoria on board Transport A40 Ceramic on 22 December 1914

Troops waiting to board HMAT Ceramic - www.nationalanzaccentre.com.au

Troops waiting to board HMAT Ceramic – www.nationalanzaccentre.com.au

Samuel William HARRY

Date of birth 9 February 1882
Religion Church of England
Occupation Town clerk
Address Town Hall, Charters Towers, North Queensland
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 32
Next of kin Mother, Mrs S H Harry, Windsor Terrace, Red Hill, Red Hill, Brisbane, Queensland
Previous military service 4 years commissioned rank in 2nd Infantry (Kennedy Regt).
Enlistment Date 28 September 1914
Rank on enlistment 2nd Lieutenant
Unit name 15th Battalion, D Company
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/32/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board Transport A40 Ceramic on 22 December 1914
Rank from Nominal Roll Captain
Unit from Nominal Roll 15th Battalion
Promotions Lieutenant
Unit: 15th Battalion
Promotion date: 16 December 1914
Captain
Unit: 15th Battalion
Promotion date: 25 April 1915

Other details from Roll of Honour Circular ‘Sent to Thursday Island at outbreak of war, and then volunteered for service with AN&MEF on 16th August, 1914. Returned to Townsville on “Kenowna” owing to trouble with fireman, 18th September, 1914. Joined AIF on 28th September, 1914. Embarked with 15th Battalion on 22nd December, 1914.’ Details from Brother.

Not a lot is known upon the arrival at ANZAC Cove, but a description of the last sighting of Samuel William Harry is here…Three parties of the 15th Battalion had pushed forward from Quinn’s Post (beginning at about 10:45pm, 9th May) and seized disconnected sections of the Turkish trench 30 yards in front. They attempted to reverse the parapet of this trench, but discovered that it was composed mainly of rotting bodies covered with soil. Meanwhile Turks poured into the gaps between each of the parties, and it became difficult for the Commander, Colonel J.H. Cannan, in Quinn’s Post, to keep touch with the progress of the attack:

‘Although gallant men continually risked their lives to ensure that headquarters should be kept fully informed, the intelligence which reached Cannan was disconnected and fragmentary. Eventually Captain Harry, acting adjutant of the 15th, volunteered to bring news of each party. After reporting that all was well with the left and right, he again went forward to find Frank Armstrong of the centre party. He reached the trench, but was never seen again.’ (Bean V2 106) (Chataway p.42).

Opinion of the death of Samuel William Harry at Quins Post

Opinion of the death of Samuel William Harry at Quins Post

A letter from Lt. Harry appeared in the North Queensland Register 5 July 1915 p29.

And:
‘Word has been received by Alderman J.T. Harry (of Charters Towers) from Major R.H. Carter (at Captain Harry’s request in case of anything happening to him) stating that Captain Harry had died at his post, having gone over with a party when they charged the enemy’s trenches.’ (North Queensland Register 26 July 1915 p69).

There had been a delay of the details of the death of Samuel William Harry, with the Mayor of Charters Towers sending and urgent telegram to assist Sarah Hannah Harry (Samuel’s mother)

Urgent Telegram sent from Mayor of Charters Towers, Queensland

Urgent Telegram sent from Mayor of Charters Towers, Queensland

On the 21st September 1915:
‘At the Town Hall today, at the request of the mayor, Councillor J. Millican and Mr Pritchard performed the ceremony of unveiling the photos of Captain S.W. Harry and Major Quinn, who were killed at the Dardanelles. Captain Harry was town clerk, while Major Quinn was a native of Charters Towers. A touching speech was made by the mayor regarding the good qualities of both officers. Captain Harry’s sword was hung under his portrait.’ (Brisbane Courier 22 Sept 1915 p7).

Ceremony for Men lost in Gallipoli from Charters Towers

Ceremony for Men lost in Gallipoli from Charters Towers

 

PROBATE GRANTED

Probate of the will of Samuel William Harry, formerly of Charters Towers, accountant, but lately an officer in the Australian Expeditionary Forces, deceased, was granted by the Registrar (Mr. Chas.S.Norris), at the Supreme Court, Townsville, to Sarah Hannah Harry of Brisbane, widow, mother of deceased. (Messrs Hobbs, Wilson, and Ryan) as town agents for Messrs. Marsland and Marsland, solicitor for executrix) Personalty sworn under £785.

Probate Granted

Probate Granted

Eventually, the effects of Samuel William Harry were returned to his mother, the receipt of these goods was signed for by her Daughter in law.

Personal effects of Samuel William Harry

Personal effects of Samuel William Harry

Samuel William Harry, received the standard medals that were awarded to the participants in the fighting at Gallipoli, these were not received by his family until 1920

War Medal

War Medal

Honours bestowed on Samuel William Harry

Honours bestowed on Samuel William Harry

Source: Record of Samuel William HARRY – NAA: B2455, HARRY S W

 

I’m very proud to tell the story of Samuel William Harry, my Gallipoli Hero.

Fiona Tellesson – First Cousin 4XRemoved.

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The History of The English Workhouse & The Scottish Poor House

The Workhouse in the UK was adopted in 1834, as an ingenious solution to the spiraling poverty that was sweeping Britain at the time.  The idea was to humiliate them and shame them into standing on their own two feet.

Charlie Chaplin was the exception the the norm from the workhouse and he went on to become one of the world’s wealthiest men earning $7 million dollars a year.

 

One in ten UK residents have a direct connection with the English Workhouse.

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